Tag Archives: Flight Attendant

10 things your flight attendant wants you to know

There was a point long ago when I fancied myself able to recite the entire air safety speech that flight attendants give before takeoff. You know: seat buckling, turbulence, life vest inflation, follow the lights, oxygen tubes and, my favorite, flotation devices.

I’ve seen flight attendants read the routine from a card, but it stands to reason they have it memorized. (Although most airlines these days are using safety videos, including some that are wildly creative and fun. It’s a delicate balance trying to raise the possibility of a catastrophic and likely fatal water landing with mirth and frivolity, but they manage to pull it off.)

 Many of you probably believe you can recite nearly all of it too. Go ahead, give it a shot. I’ll wait. (Insert “Jeopardy” music here.)

See? Not as easy as it seems. I tried it once at a party and failed miserably. The passengers under my care would most certainly perish.

I also thought I had a handle on how badly behaved air passengers can be. That is, until I chatted in the galley on a cross-country flight with three flight attendants. Just making conversation, I asked, “If you could, what instructions would you also give to passengers before every flight to make everyone’s life better?”

They all started to talk at once, one with a crazed look in her eyes, another gesturing wildly. One of them muttered, “They check their brains when they check their bags.” I might have touched a nerve.

Then I asked, “There’s a video for basic safety on the airplane; why isn’t there a video for basic courtesy and common sense? What would be in it?”

They talked, I took notes. What follows are 10 of their specific recommendations:

Do not try to get a flight attendant’s attention by poking with one finger: These are people, not pin cushions. Use your voice or your whole hand on a shoulder or arm. Or if it isn’t urgent, wait.

Do not put your feet or head on the tray table: Why not your feet? Because it’s disgusting. People eat from the tray. Why not your head? Because the slob on the flight before yours put his feet on it.

Never walk around airplanes with no shoes: Take the most horrifically gross thing you can imagine on a plane — now picture yourself walking through it in socks. Yup.

Don’t abuse the call button, especially not before 10,000 feet: Unless you’re having a heart attack, there isn’t much flight attendants can, will or should do for you before 10,000 feet. (The corollary to this is: Look carefully before turning on your light, because it might be the call button.) If the plane is still gaining altitude and you really need to use the bathroom, that brings us to …

Use the restroom near the gate before boarding the plane: Thanks to space hogs who bring giant “carry-on bags,” boarding takes twice as long as it once did, and more flight traffic these days means more waiting on the tarmac. Don’t be the numbskull who downs a couple of pints right as his boarding group is called, then wonders why he can’t use the restroom as the wheels are leaving the ground.

There’s a reason you put personal items all the way underneath the seat: There’s the safety issue: You and your seatmates need a clear path in an emergency. There’s also a courtesy issue: You and your seatmates should have a clear path so it isn’t a giant hassle every time someone gets up.

Listen to all announcements, not just the seat belt light and when to turn off your phone: Why? Because when you stop a flight attendant and ask a question that was just covered in an announcement 10 seconds ago, he or she will give you that look. The look of a beleaguered preschool teacher trying to explain something to a 4-year-old — for the fifth time. That’s why.

Overhead bins don’t get cleaned: No message here, just something a flight attendant wants you to think about.

Do not order a hot drink during turbulence: Seems painfully obvious, right? And yet.

Do not ever hand a used diaper to a flight attendant: Ever. Seriously.

If you remember nothing else, remember that flight attendants are people, most of them hardworking, underpaid professionals who are just trying to get you there safely. And their bosses aren’t making it any easier.

Remember that and they won’t need to make the video.

This Flight attendant leaves passengers stunned by what he said over the speaker

Southwest Airlines is well known for its lower fares and more relaxed attitude about air travel, and the video below makes it very clear why!

FlightAttendantSpeechThe flight attendant in this clip is both talented and dedicated, and he is bound and determined to give his passengers a bit of entertainment as the board the flight, find their seats and put away their bags.

This musical Southwest flight attendant named David puts on a funny, but quite professional rap version of the usual safety and introductory speech that passengers here on every single airline flight they take.

David’s rap song version covered all of the important information but presented it to passengers in a much more entertaining fashion. He began by asking the passengers on the flight to please clap their hands or stomp their feet to give him a beat to work with. Once a few passengers started up, pretty soon most of the cabin was clapping or stomping along, and David launched into his rap safety / instructional spiel.

The talented flight attendant and rap artist got a hearty and well deserved round of applause at the end of his rap monologue.

Flight attendant leaves passengers stunned by what he said over the speaker

Southwest Airlines is well known for its lower fares and more relaxed attitude about air travel, and the video below makes it very clear why!

FlightAttendantSpeechThe flight attendant in this clip is both talented and dedicated, and he is bound and determined to give his passengers a bit of entertainment as the board the flight, find their seats and put away their bags.

This musical Southwest flight attendant named David puts on a funny, but quite professional rap version of the usual safety and introductory speech that passengers here on every single airline flight they take.

David’s rap song version covered all of the important information but presented it to passengers in a much more entertaining fashion. He began by asking the passengers on the flight to please clap their hands or stomp their feet to give him a beat to work with. Once a few passengers started up, pretty soon most of the cabin was clapping or stomping along, and David launched into his rap safety / instructional spiel.

The talented flight attendant and rap artist got a hearty and well deserved round of applause at the end of his rap monologue.

A Flight Attendant Just Revealed The Secret To More Room On A Plane, And It’s Amazing

I don’t know about you, but I’m already planning my summer vacay. I’ve got enough crap to worry about that seats are pretty low on my list.

That being said, every single time I end up on a plane, I always end up with too little room. Between my boyfriend sleeping on my shoulder and the random beside me, I can’t escape. I know, that’s technically my fault for taking the middle seat, but I HATE the aisle seats.

Or I did at least. Now I’m not so sure. You know how there’s just never enough room on the plane? Well, a redditor has done us all a solid and given us an inside tip!

Chances are you’ll be booking seats differently from now on. SHARE this with your friends so they can cheat the system too!

I think we can all agree that being stuck on a plane for hours at a time can be less than pleasant.

It’s cramped, uncomfortable, and there’s always that one person who just doesn’t understand airplane etiquette.

It's cramped, uncomfortable, and there's always that one person who just doesn't understand airplane etiquette.
via Giphy
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And if you’re the one stuck in the aisle seat, you’re doubly screwed.

I mean sure, you can get up to go to the washroom easily, but that’s about it.

One of the biggest issues is that you have someone in the middle seat beside you and your armrest doesn’t even go up!

Who needs elbow room anyways?

One of the biggest issues is that you have someone in the middle seat beside you and your armrest doesn't even go up!
via CHEEZburger

Or does it?

It turns out that redditors know more than we do when it comes to airplanes. At least the people who work for airlines do, anyways!

Or does it?
via Giphy

Well, it turns out we were wrong after all.

According to this reddit user, the aisle seat arms can go up! You just have to know where the button is.

Well, it turns out we were wrong after all.
via reddit / Goat_Porker

So there you have it! One of the many mysteries of planes solved once and for all.

Happy flying 🙂

It’s pretty safe to say you’re not the only one who’s annoyed by those armrests, so be sure to SHARE this game changer with your friends!

Stewardess? Steward? How about just Flight attendant?

Pan American Stewardesses in their uniforms in the 1960’s
Pan American Stewardesses in their uniforms in the 1960’s

Being a flight attendant has been my ideal career path since I have gotten to college. Being a Flight Attendant has changed a lot since the commercial jet age in the 1960’s. Let’s talk about why.

Flight Attendant versus Stewardess

Being a Flight Attendant in the 1960’s meant that you were referred to as a stewardess or a female steward. That meant that you were “attending” to the passengers needs while they were on the airplane. The most popular Stewardesses were the ones that were employed by Pan American Airlines.

To be qualified for the job you had to have a college degree as well as nursing training. Not only did you have to be educated you also had to be  female, physically attractive, be a certain height, between a certain age, and weigh a certain amount (once hired there were mandatory weight checks). Being a stewardess was about having the perfect combination as a woman. You had to essentially take care of others while looking good doing it. According to ABC News, a girdle was a part of the uniform as well.

How has it changed?

A person in the 21st century that assists passengers on an airplane to ensure their needs and safety is now referred to as Flight attendant. The requirements to get hired as a flight attendant are much more reasonable. You must be at least 21 years of age, have a High School diploma, and have customer service experience. You do not have to be strictly female to be hired by an airline, but because this career is associated with mostly women few men apply.

Why the change matters?

Julia T. Wood talks about in her book Gendered Lives how there are certain stereotypes within the work place for both male and females. For females the most common stereotypes are being a sex object, mother, child, or iron maiden.

American airlines 21st century Flight attendants
American airlines 21st century Flight attendants

For males the most common stereotypes are being a sturdy oak, fighter, and breadwinner. Being a stewardess in the 1960’s portrayed two out of the four stereotypes for women. The women were made into sex objects by what they had to wear to work such as the girdle and tight blue skirts (for Pan American in particular).The women were defined by their sexuality and that was also how they were ultimately hired. Second, these stewardesses were also defined by the stereotype of mother. These women were expected to take care of their customers’ needs. That included listening to their concerns or pouring them a drink. Finally, the reason why the changes for flight attendants is positive is because these stereotypes are diminishing, making it easier for males to apply to be a Flight Attendant. Although, because of the male stereotype of breadwinner, which states that the males have to take home more money than women, could be preventing more males from diving into this position. I think that moving away from the traditional “stewardess” is great and I think that more men should consider breaking this gendered norm and apply to be a Flight Attendant. I mean, what person would not what to travel the world?!

If you’re interested check out theses Articles about real Pan Am Stewardesses!